We live in a split-level single family house. We saw some rat droppings in the upper floor. We kais these glue traps in the upper and lower floor. The next day a rat was stuck at the lower floor glue tray. We threw the tray and put in another one. We did not catch any more rats and saw no more droppings. These glue trays are easy to set up and the price is very reasonable. It is wide and can easily be separated in two trays. I am a happy satisfied customer.
I prefer it to snap traps because of the lack of blood and gore – the body is very easily disposed of without leaving a mess behind which is a potential hazard to chickens, pets, wildlife or children.
I use these to discourage our cat from getting into areas she shouldn’t be. Don’t worry, she doesn’t get stuck to it. Once they see that it’s sticky they avoid it completely. Much cheaper than alternate methods. Glue is non toxic so it won’t hurt your furry friends, just keeps them out of places they shouldn’t be.
This is probably the easiest of them all to make! All it takes is paper. Well, alright, some tape too, and definitely a bucket or trash can for the rodents to land in, but that’s about it! Just fold the paper, bait the end, and hang it halfway over a ledge. By the time the rat realizes that the bottom won’t hold its weight, it’ll be too late. Keep in mind that rats and mice are amazing jumpers and could free themselves depending on how large the container is, or if there’s water in it.
If you have a skittish mouse, you may need to modify the closing mechanism so that rather than pulling the looped string up from the skewer in the bottle’s end by hand, you pull from a distance away with another length of string. Doing so could increase the trap’s effectiveness, but will require more patience on your part.
First, buy a small live trap. It looks like a wire cage with a loaded door that shuts behind a rat after it enters. In fact, the caught rodent stays alive. However, the aim of our homemade rat trap is to catch and kill at once. Batteries supply current and make it possible to design a rat killer from any commercially available cage.
Another Help Website

If you see one, there is usually more. And they don’t leave on their own accord. I reset the trap after 11 o’clock that night – way past my bed time. Checked the next morning and one of his girlfriends couldn’t resist the cheese. Disposed of her and reset. You guessed it, caught another one! Three dead rats.
You cut a hole out of the top of the shoebox and tape two pieces of paper to form a trap door. We placed a little bit of cracker crumbs on our trapped doors with some peanut butter smeared very lightly to prevent it from weighing the door down and it worked great.
Safety Information No chemicals or poisons, built in safety switch and beveled tunnel design protects children and pets No chemicals or poisons, use with caution around children and pets No chemicals or poisons, use with caution around children and pets No chemicals or poisons, use with caution around children and pets No chemicals or poisons, use with caution around children and pets
The comedy behind this poster makes this a favorite and the best part, the person who wrote it, says it works. Read below for the directions on this one but be sure to read them all, as I can see skipping number six may lead to a tipped over bottle and an escapee!
You’ll quickly notice how handy buckets are for homemade rat traps. The rolling log trap is similar to the bottle trap in that the “log” spins, dropping rats and mice down into the bucket. This is a cheap multi-catch option that won’t break or wear out easily and can be used again and again.
I have a huge rat problem going on… They are in the crawl space above my kitchen having a grand ol’ time and living quite comfortably. I didnt notice the screen covers on the vents have holes in them and they just climb the stucco to get up there – this was pointed out to me by a pest control inspector. Worst of all there is no way for a person to access this area to get them out, nor poison them and have them die up there, potentially.
This one when I first found it I gave it no mind. I then saw it again on another forum and decided to investigate it a little further.  At first, it looks as if there is just a glass upside down held up by a nickel. Looking closely you can see there is peanut butter smeared on the bottom of the glass. Apparently a penny isn’t big enough so the nickel is the correct size to use here.
You see a shadow move from out of the corner of your eye. Then, you start noticing droppings along your baseboards, in the pantry, and maybe even on the kitchen countertops. You might as well face it—you have rodents. Once you get over the “yuck” factor, there are some simple, no-nonsense steps you can take to deal with the problem. Whatever you encounter, Tomcat has you covered with a wide variety of options to suit your individual needs and preferences.
Use a strong disinfectant to clean areas where you’ve seen grimy trails and mouse poop, especially around their entry points, so that new mice don’t find their way in after you’ve trapped those already in your home. Also thoroughly clean up and disinfect anyplace you see mice droppings, as their location also communicates to other mice.[28]
Be sure to thoroughly clean the snap traps between uses. Rats will smell “death” on a trap that’s recently killed another rat. I have the black plastic snap traps. After removing the dead rat (triple wrapped in plastic and put in the deep freeze until garbage day), I drop the trap into a bucket with about a litre of very hot water and some bleach; soak for a few hours, scrub with a brush and then, if you want, rewash it (I actually put mine in the dishwasher, after a thorough bleaching and scrubbing). It should just smell like clean plastic when it comes out of the dishwasher. Re-bait it, put it where the rats are active, let it do its thing, and repeat! 🙂 I am sorry that I have to kill these buggers, but if they’re in my house, they need to be killed. My house is 108 years old and has all kinds of secret places for rodents to come and go, but this year (2016), here on Vancouver Island, there is a huge rat problem so I’ve become very cutthroat about killing them.
A video on how to set this trap can be found by clicking on the link below. We hope this information was helpful. Please feel free to contact our Consumer Relations Team at 1-855-5-ZAREBA (1-855-592-7322) with any questions or for additional assistance.
I think it depends where they are plugged in, my outlets are minimal and builder put them in sideways, I didn’t plan how to put them in I just put them where I could but they work. I live alone so I can’t call someone to kill bugs for me and I am terrified of bugs so I am happy.
Seal off wherever the rodents are entering your home. One of the most important and effective ways of controlling unwanted rodents is blocking off their entrance point. This will prevent more rodents from getting into your home.
I bought these as an Add-On item for relatively inexpensive cost ($2.98) and I thought I would give them a try for this cheap. The other paper glue stuff I bought caught fiddler crabs and palmetto bugs; no rats or mice. I think the rats made fun of the lower quality glue paper as I found it pushed aside with no indication of rodent fur.
A simple internet search for no-kill rat traps will also bring up many ““homemade” devices. One uses a liter soda bottle cut apart and fashioned into a funnel with plastic “spikes” cut into the opening. This operates on the same principle as the wire cage funnel trap, with the funnel positioned so that the rat is trapped in the body of the bottle unharmed and ready for release.
A similar trap I have seen and read about, that said that it was for the big ones was a barrel trap. It was basically the same thing, except a barrel (like a 55 gallon drum) with a tarp or plastic tied tightly over it, with an x cut in the middle. The bait was then put in the middle (they used corn I believe). When the rat walked out over it, it would collapse. The guy I learned this from used it to catch big field rats for bait for his trapline. Don’t know if it would work, but it sounds like it would catch big ones better than that one. I guess it would be akin to trying to trap a coyote in a rabbit trap. Even if the trap works, if the animal is too big, it won’t work.
Quick answer. They don’t work! I found this page while researching how to deter rats in walls because I literally have one right now in my wall. It kept me up all night chewing and scratching at the wall. The wall it is on has one of these devices plugged in to it. I turned it to the max setting and still the little turd was scratching away. It could care less about the noise. It’s more annoying to me than the rat. Don’t waste your money. Lucky for me, I bought mine on a flash sale from amazon so it wasn’t too expensive. Waste of money. It’s a gimmic that people are getting roped into like every other gimmic.
The safer cleaner solution. Unlike conventional snap traps The safer cleaner solution. Unlike conventional snap traps that misfire or only maim rodents the Nooski mouse trap never misfires and kills every time. The innovative design means trapping mice is easy with no mess or snapped fingers. DIY pest control made simple!  More + Product Details Close
We use a tall kitchen garbage can and a piece of news paper with an x cut into it. Tiny piece of tape in center keeps together. Fill with enough water so they can’t touch bottom. Sprinkle with some bait and wait. I live near a crick that is connected to a major river. It brings rats right to my house. Great big river rats. Works great and don’t have to worry about my pets. When rats get tired from swimming they drown. Just fish out with a rake and reset.
Snap traps are the most practical option due to their low cost which lets you affordably place and set many traps at once.  However, snap traps are a little hard to use and some folks prefer electric rat zappers.
The rat, enticed into the box by a yummy treat at the entrance and smeared on the back wall , steps on a metal plate.  This triggers an electric shock which – as long as the batteries are full or nearly full – kills within a couple of seconds.
For rat trap DIY, you will need a piece of metal plate, a small cage rat trap, jumper cables and a 12V battery. Cage rat traps are commercially available nowadays. They simply catch rodents that enter our homes. Connecting cages to batteries allows to kill the pests immediately.
About Victor® Victor® has been a trusted name in rodent control since 1898. Since the invention of the spring-based trap over 115 years ago, we have been continuously striving to manufacture innovative, quality products that keep your family safe from the dangers of rodents. With a variety of electronic traps, snap traps and repellents available, Victor® has a broad selection of products to meet the needs of consumers. More About Victor® »
Some rats can be trap shy. They are shy of new objects and placing unset traps in a new location for a few days will increase the catch. Camouflaging the trap in a shallow pan of grain or sawdust could hide it. Place the bait in a few small placements on the top surface without setting the trap. When the rats start taking the bait, set the trap, leaving only one bait placement in the set trap. Rat traps should not be relocated once a good location is found as this will set up a new obect reaction. Mice are naturally curious so frequent trap relocations will attract their interest.
Keep Trapping: The best results for both rodents and insects come from using ultrasonic pest repellents along with trapping. Simply put, the sound waves cause the pests to scurry around, which drives them right into your traps.
guys I am relocated in Vietnam where I was facing big rats(about 50 big rats) in our company I bought traps from eBay when I was in London, but i am sorry to say it only worked on mice sometimes and had no effect on big rats, I used following procedure to kill all the rats.
The pungent smell of pepper makes it hard for the rats to breathe and threatens their survival. Simply sprinkle some crushed pepper around the corners and the holes where they reside. You will notice positive results. Repeat the process if necessary.
I have (so far) not had to deal with rats, but in my yard, grounds and garden I had an infestation of chipmunks or ground squirrels as some call them. They were the most persistent vermin I ever encountered and were NOT nocturnal. They liked to dig and run through burrows, and would strip a tomato plant in one day by taking a bite from every fruit. AND, it was illegal to shoot, trap or poison them (“wildlife protection!”) So I had to take a stealthier route as the wife’s stupid dog would probably have eaten any poison baits.
Third, attach jumper cables to the metal plate at the back of the cage. The clips on the cables should just barely fit onto the edge of the mesh cage. Set the trapdoor loading the spring as directed on the product label. Place the electric cage rat trap diy in a rodent-infested area.