Place the tube on the edge of a countertop or second story landing. Place the tube in such a way so that about 40% of it, including the baited end, hangs over the edge of the landing.[2] If necessary, affix the tube with a small piece of tape, but take care not to tape it so firmly that it would not give way and tip over the edge of the landing or countertop when the baited end was subjected to slight force.
A: Remove the small staple holding the locking bar to the wood base. Place bait inside curl found at the end of the bait pedal.  Pull back bow and hold down with thumb. With other hand, engage the curved portion locking bar under the small, V-shaped lip on the bait pedal.
When baiting the trap, it is important to use only a small, pea size amount of bait. We have found that peanut butter, or something high in protein (such as a hazelnut spread or chocolate) works well. Placement of the trap is also very important. We recommend placing the trap along the wall where rodents primarily travel. The end of the trap where the metal pedal is baited should be placed flush against the wall.
It is a stinky process but one of the best ways to prevent these rodents. Take some cow dung cakes and spread them in your attic or garden. When rats eat the cow dung, it will inflame their stomach and lead them to die. Thus, helps get rid of rats outside the house.
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The concept here may seem complicated but its actually quite simple.  On either side of the trapped door, is two rubber bands pulling at the door which is being held up by the trigger. The trigger is the red twine that runs to the bait in the bottom of the bottle.
When rats take up residence under the kitchen sink, a rat trap is often required to evict the pesky visitors. Snap traps are thought of as the more humane lethal rat trap, killing rats quickly. Snap traps also don’t pose the health risks affiliated with rat poisons.
Change of plans. This bucket trap may work for mice but not for this nemesis! As Roy Scheider, star of Jaws, said when he laid eyes on the shark, “Your going to need a bigger boat.” When dealing with Ratzilla and his kin, you’re going to need a bigger bucket!
Like Mark says above, when it was plugged in, my dog reacted to it immediately. I tested this by plugging and unplugging it, and it was obvious that the sound of the repellent (not audible to us) was bothering him.
• bait type matters!: we first tried peanut butter with no results on the rats, but it resulted in some very unfortunate collateral damage to other rodents… so, we switched to raw bacon, and, while the other rodents were disinterested, the rats can not resist… and, snap!
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I’ve had one of these in my kitchen for 2 yrs, didn’t know that pests can get used to the sound. Nevertheless I bought a few more of them for some other rooms in my home. I’ve been seeing a lot of spiders in the house, so I will know if it works on them. I do recommend them, no ants, roaches that I seen. I do think that I will unplug them for a short while and then plug them in again.
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We had a double deck built in August this year thus, assume this is where the origin of our problem occurred. As a result, we began to see a large brown rat of which had burrowed under the deck up against the basement wall. With the sound of constant chewing then sudden squealing we realized she had given birth. The rodent entered at the outside air condition unit under the deck and now, are in the basement . At this point, we hired a pest control to use humane options $400. caught one rat and did not leave the trap at that cost! Obviously glue traps do not work,after the first release. Then, again able to remove the bait from another clamp trap apparently out smarting us again. What about a bucket trap? Advise please.
This one when I first found it I gave it no mind. I then saw it again on another forum and decided to investigate it a little further.  At first, it looks as if there is just a glass upside down held up by a nickel. Looking closely you can see there is peanut butter smeared on the bottom of the glass. Apparently a penny isn’t big enough so the nickel is the correct size to use here.
Decided to try some traps, guess what !? Spent another $60 for 2 traps in vain. No rats were caught in almost a month, nevertheless rats became less and less shy, sometimes appearing in broad daylight.
Overall this seems like a good product and I like its non-toxic properties, but, it was not effective for me at catching rodents. Instead, I have ordered the $60 Raticator with 7000-volts of “old sparky” level rat shocking ability and expect delivery today. I can’t wait to put the “D” cell batteries in that baby and start zapping some rats into oblivion as it has very high reviews.
If you are concerned about the mice suffering I would not use these. I have seen mice that struggle for several days. But we have deer mice and they can carry the hanta virus which is often fatal. Sometimes this is the only thing that works for me.
Snap traps are the most practical option due to their low cost which lets you affordably place and set many traps at once.  However, snap traps are a little hard to use and some folks prefer electric rat zappers.
High-Voltage Shock Humanely Kills Rodents This powerful device works by delivering a humane, high-voltage shock to effectively eliminate rat invaders, and is capable of eliminating up to 50 rats per set of fully charged batteries (4 “C” included for each trap). Plus, with this trap, there’s no need for poisons or chemicals, allowing it to be used anywhere inside your home or business.
Every home I lived in I would purchase an electronic repellent. I did because I am terrified of rats. well I never had a rat in my home or around it from my knowledge but I felt like it was because I’ve always had the repellents plugged in. Well in this new home im in lately I’ve been seeing them run across my privacy gate. I have the plugs all around the house and its not working seeing them on the fence and just tonight actually seen one on the ground. Sorry for the long story but no they do not work!!!!! Plus there’s lizards and other type of little bugs that be by my back door even with the 3 plugs plugged in
The box of traps arrived in a timely fashion and I set to work baiting the traps with peanut butter and setting only two before the rat’s seemingly regularly scheduled dinner time. I placed one along the base of a fence I’d seen it use as its own personal rat highway. And, I placed the second one in the garden among the Chablis peppers and the rat turds that were the size of small logs. The trap along the base of the fence was well situated, directly in the rat’s path and facing the fence, as the instructional videos recommend. The plants along the edge of the yard provide good cover for animals as they move along the outskirts of the yard, obscured from direct line of sight. And, the one in the garden was among the half eaten remains of peppers that had already fallen prey to the rat’s insatiable appetite. Then, the hard part … waiting.
I tried the live traps and the sticky traps and nothing! I finally just decided to get these old fashioned ones and….oh snap, I caught 2 mice the first night! I’m not sure why these get bad reviews, they couldn’t be any easier and they WORK!
I purchased the electronic pest repeller and plugged it in. Later in the day I saw a roach, grabbed the electronic pest repeller out of the wall socket and smashed the roach with it. The roach was deffinately dead. The device was 100% effective, and the easy storage in electrical outlets makes it handy. I’m going to purchase one for every outlet in this roach hell hotel.
So if you’re looking for a quick and safe way of killing them, you need a trap which will stop their heart – permanently.   It may sound “heartless” – but isn’t it better than your chickens getting ill?
You can make a good homemade trap out of milk bottle. To do this, take a bottle and pour oil on the wall in order to make it slippery. You should also be put inside the bait. Also, you should attach any rail on the bottleneck so the mouse can climb up the bottle. Leave the trap all night. When a mouse finds food, it will climb up the rail and eventually fall into the bottle. But slippery walls will prevent it from getting out. This method is also humane: you can release the mouse outside. But this water bottle homemade rat trap is often too small for large fattened rats.
Rats and mice have always been a problem in this rural area as they live in the wild areas not far from buildings. Vehicles in my carport were frequently infested and nothing would stop new rodents from coming no matter how many were trapped or poisoned. I bought a VENSMILE Fireproof Rodent Repeller several months ago. I attached it to a car battery and placed it hanging on the wall in the center of my carport. FOR THE FIRST TIME, I HAVE NOT SEEN EVIDENCE OF EVEN ONE RAT OR MOUSE IN THE CARPORT NOR IN THE AREA IMMEDIATELY AROUND THE CARPORT FOR THE LAST 4 MONTHS! A couple weeks ago, I put it in our watertank house where rats had been living for years no matter how many were killed – They all left that night and have not been back since! I would say that that is proof that at least this one works. It has a varying signal that is claimed to prevent rodents from getting used to the sound. I have just bought 8 AC ones to put in the house and basement. If they work I will be very happy! Have tests been run on the newer multi/varying sound ones? If not they should be tested separately from the ones that have only one ultrasonic sound.
If a man can write a better book, preach a better sermon or make a better mouse trap than his neighbor, though he builds his house in the woods. The world will make a beaten path to his door.  Ralph Waldo Emerson
For your convenience, the trap’s design allows you to easily dispose of the dead rodent without having to see or touch it. The new and improved design of the electronic trap has a removable kill chamber, which provides better plate access so you can easily clean and bait it in between uses. These traps require no poison or chemicals and can be used anywhere inside your home or business to ensure years of effective rat control.
At about 5:45 of the video, you can see how the bait is set up with a small needle or maybe a toothpick that goes through the hole and held up by the red band. The rat, or mouse, enters in through the trapped door, pulls at the bait, which releases the tension by releasing the line to the door, and the rubber bands pull the door shut holding so much force as to keeping it closed.
Many of us have dogs and cats that roam the yard — a rat trap won’t kill them, but it will hurt them pretty badly. What I do is put down a rat trap – baited with bacon (unlike previous poster, I’m not much for sewing, so I use a twist-tie) – and put it under a plastic milk crate with a couple cinder blocks sitting on top. The pets can’t get to the trap, but the rats can . . . pop goes the rodent! P.S. since I’m lazy, I put the trap set next to the trash can, so I don’t have to walk too far with a dead, stinkin’, flea infested rat.
We have a couple of cats, only problem is wife feeds them all day long so they will not catch mice/rats. If she isn’t at home for a few days/weeks, I tend to give the cats only a single small meal per day and keep a few outside. Then rats/mice are reduced drastically.
We caught chipmunks in our backyard with the department store cages. I decided to use the big corded ultrasound device, that my dad loves having in the basement for bugs, on a chipmunk in a cage. On all 10 supposed frequencies this God-mode device has, like the loud one for squirrels and down to the anti-bedbug, the chipmunk didn’t react one bit!
Another live capture cage trap uses a wire funnel that allows only one way movement into the device. Rats can squeeze themselves forward through openings as small as a quarter but cannot exit due exposed wires at the end of the funnel. The sharp ends poke the rodents in the face and body if they make the attempt.
I find a splash of Pine Sol to be helpful with dead critter stink. Don’t know if it will deter the buggers from coming to the bait, but it probably won’t, in itself, kill anything else that comes along. Bec is right, ethylene glycol is highly toxic . . . but attracts animals due to its sweet taste. Don’t wan’t to kill the birds and bees and dogs and deer . . . just the rats.
Drive a stick through the opposite ends of the water bottle (Or whatever object you chose to use. It should be cylindrical and easy to roll.) Drill holes in two sides of the bucket near the top where you can slide the hanger through. Fill the bucket with water. (optional) Set up your ramps, and then bait the rolling mechanism. You’ll have rats climbing up to get to the delicious bait only to be dropped to the bottom of the bucket!